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THE WALL

THE WALL

A large section of the wall against which the Massacre victims stood is on display at The Mob Museum. The wall was torn down in 1967, and a Vancouver businessman took home the bricks, which over four decades he displayed in a traveling exhibit, a crime museum and a nightclub. They finally found a permanent home in The Mob Museum in 2012.

The Mob Museum owns a large section of the brick wall against which the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre victims stood.

In 1967, the wall was torn down, and a Vancouver businessman named George Patey bought the bricks, some of which had divots from bullets fired during the Massacre. Over the next 42 years, the bricks were featured in a traveling exhibit, housed in a short-lived crime museum and displayed in the men’s restroom of a nightclub. They finally found a permanent home at The Mob Museum in 2012.

From their first sale in 1967, the bricks were lettered and numbered, allowing The Mob Museum to assemble and display the wall in a manner very close to the original. At some point, some of the bullet holes in the bricks were enhanced by red paint (no, it’s not blood).

Photo of Mob Museum Display of Massacre Wall
The bricks from the wall of the Chicago garage where the Massacre occurred are on display at The Mob Museum.

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See this artifact and more at The Mob Museum - The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre. Feb. 14th, 1929.
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